Events for Book Readings and Signings

Author in the House featuring Jessica Day George

Join us at the Sweet Library for an evening of storytelling and conversation with New York Times bestselling author Jessica Day George. Jessica is the author of over a dozen fantasy books for teens and middle grade readers, Including Dragon Slippers, and the newly published The Queen’s Secret. She has a degree in Humanities/Comparative Literature and a minor in Scandinavian Studies from BYU. She speaks German and Norwegian and can read Old Norse. She enjoys knitting, everything Disney, putting peanut M&M’s in her movie theater popcorn, very small dogs, and traveling. An avid reader, she has a monthly newsletter called Jessica Recommends . . . and if you’re wondering, she likes her chocolate dark. The reading is free and open to the public.



Ayja Bounous and Zack Podmore Meet & Greet

Join Torrey House authors Zak Podmore and Ayja Bounous for a short pre-release reading of their upcoming books followed by a meet-and-mingle night of food, drinks, and conversation at Fisher Brewing Company, presented in partnership with Save Our Canyons and Patagonia SLC. Confluence: Navigating the Personal & Political on Rivers of the New West sets out to explore exploited Western rivers—and some of the most pressing environmental justice issues of our time. After losing his river-running mother to cancer, Zak Podmore disappears into the American West’s iconic canyon country to heal. He kayaks down a rare release of water in the Colorado River Delta, investigates uranium tailings on Ute Mountain Ute lands near the San Juan River, and interrogates the treatment of asylum seekers crossing the Rio Grande. Confluence presents an up-close, personal perspective on our responsibility to rivers and to each other. Zak Podmore is an award-winning writer whose work has appeared in Outside, Sierra, High Country News, and Canoe & Kayak. He lives in Utah where he reports for The Salt Lake Tribune. From mountain ecology to population pressure, Shaped by Snow: Defending the Future of Winter examines the environmental impacts of the ski industry—even as Ayja Bounous celebrates a legacy of snow and love from a family instrumental in its development. Exploring threats to winter due to climate change, Bounous realizes how deeply her personal relationships are tied to a disappearing season. Climate activist and third-generation skier Ayja Bounous holds an MA in Environmental Humanities from the University of Utah. She lives at the base of the Wasatch Mountains in Salt Lake City.

This event is presented by Torrey House Press, Fisher Brewing Co., Patagonia SLC outlet, Save Our Canyons, and the Utah Humanities Book Festival. This event is supported in part by Utah Humanities; the Utah Department of Arts & Museums; and SLCo Zoo, Arts & Parks.



Friends of the Marriott Library Books and Authors Series

Dr. Sondra G. Jones, Author of Being and Becoming Ute In her book, Being and Becoming Ute, (University of Utah Press, 2019), Dr. Sondra G. Jones traces the metamorphosis of the Ute people from a society of small, interrelated bands of mobile hunter-gatherers to sovereign, dependent nations—modern tribes who run extensive business enterprises and government services. Weaving together the history of all Ute groups—in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico—the narrative describes their traditional culture, including the many facets that define them as a people. Jones emphasizes how the Utes adapted over four centuries and details events, conflicts, trade, and social interactions with non-Utes and non-Indians. The book also explores the concerns of the modern Ute world including social and medical issues, transformed religion, and the fight to maintain Ute identity in the twenty-first century. Sondra Jones holds a PhD in history from the University of Utah. She has taught classes in American, World, Utah and Native American History, and courses on writing for the University of Utah, Brigham Young University and Utah Valley University. Her publications include journal articles and books including the award-winning Don Pedro León Luján: The Attack against Indian Slavery and Mexican Traders in Utah (University of Utah Press, 19



Ellen Meloy and the Next Generation of Nature Writers

Join us for a celebration and panel discussion on the late author Ellen Meloy and her posthumously published book of essays, Seasons: Desert Essays. Moderator Jeff McCarthy and authors Ann Walka and Karin Anderson will explore Ellen's impact on the next generation of nature writers, with live readings by current Environmental Humanities graduate students. Join in the conversation on how Meloy's work endures and is affecting a new generation of nature writers' outlook and style.  With understated humor and sharp insight, Meloy illuminates facets of human connection to nature and challenge listeners to examine the world anew.

Seasons: Desert Sketches is a compilation of radio essays, transcribed from their original cassette tape recordings. Whether Meloy is pondering geese in Desolation Canyon or people at the local post office, readers will delight in her signature wit and charm—and feel the pull of the desert she loves and defends. Ellen Meloy was a native of the West and lived in California, Montana, and Utah. Her book The Anthropology of Turquoise (2002) was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and won the Utah Book Award and the Banff Mountain Book Festival Award in the adventure and travel category. She is also the author of Raven’s Exile: A Season on the Green River (1994), The Last Cheater’s Waltz: Beauty and Violence in the Desert Southwest (2001), and Eating Stone: Imagination and the Loss of the Wild (2005), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Meloy spent most of her life in wild, remote places; at the time of her sudden death in November 2004 (three months after completing Eating Stone), she and her husband were living in southern Utah. Jeffrey Mathes McCarthy, Ph.D., is director of Environmental Humanities at the University of Utah. Poet and naturalist Ann Weiler Walka worked for decades as a museum educator and back country guide. She moved to Bluff at the same time as Mark and Ellen Meloy, and for nearly 10 years Ann hiked and floated, gossiped and philosophized, talked writing and taught writing with Ellen. Ellen will always be a beloved companion on Ann’s explorations of landscapes of the imagination. Karin Anderson is a gardener, writer, mother, wanderer, heretic, and English professor at Utah Valley University. She hails from the Great Basin of Utah.

This free event is presented by Ken Sanders Rare Books, U of U Environmental Humanities, and Torrey House Press. It is supported in part by Utah Humanities; Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks; and Utah Division of Arts and Museums, with funding from the state of Utah and the National Endowment for the Arts.



Ellen Meloy and the Next Generation of Nature Writers

Join us for a celebration and panel discussion on the late author Ellen Meloy and her posthumously published book of essays, Seasons: Desert Essays. Moderator Jeff McCarthy and authors Ann Walka and Karin Anderson will explore Ellen's impact on the next generation of nature writers, with live readings by current Environmental Humanities graduate students. Join in the conversation on how Meloy's work endures and is affecting a new generation of nature writers' outlook and style.  With understated humor and sharp insight, Meloy illuminates facets of human connection to nature and challenge listeners to examine the world anew.

Seasons: Desert Sketches is a compilation of radio essays, transcribed from their original cassette tape recordings. Whether Meloy is pondering geese in Desolation Canyon or people at the local post office, readers will delight in her signature wit and charm—and feel the pull of the desert she loves and defends. Ellen Meloy was a native of the West and lived in California, Montana, and Utah. Her book The Anthropology of Turquoise (2002) was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and won the Utah Book Award and the Banff Mountain Book Festival Award in the adventure and travel category. She is also the author of Raven’s Exile: A Season on the Green River (1994), The Last Cheater’s Waltz: Beauty and Violence in the Desert Southwest (2001), and Eating Stone: Imagination and the Loss of the Wild (2005), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Meloy spent most of her life in wild, remote places; at the time of her sudden death in November 2004 (three months after completing Eating Stone), she and her husband were living in southern Utah. Jeffrey Mathes McCarthy, Ph.D., is director of Environmental Humanities at the University of Utah. Poet and naturalist Ann Weiler Walka worked for decades as a museum educator and back country guide. She moved to Bluff at the same time as Mark and Ellen Meloy, and for nearly 10 years Ann hiked and floated, gossiped and philosophized, talked writing and taught writing with Ellen. Ellen will always be a beloved companion on Ann’s explorations of landscapes of the imagination. Karin Anderson is a gardener, writer, mother, wanderer, heretic, and English professor at Utah Valley University. She hails from the Great Basin of Utah.

This free event is presented by Ken Sanders Rare Books, U of U Environmental Humanities, and Torrey House Press. It is supported in part by Utah Humanities; Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks; and Utah Division of Arts and Museums, with funding from the state of Utah and the National Endowment for the Arts.



Craig Childs and Claire Taylor Book Launch: Virga and Bone

Join us at The King's English Bookshop for the launch of author Craig Childs' new book of essays, Virga & Bone: Essays from Dry Places, illustrated by local Salt Lake artist Claire Taylor. Dwelling on a vivid series of desert icons—a sheet of virga over Monument Valley, white seashells in dry desert sand, boulders impossibly balanced—Virga & Bone delves into the primacy of our starkest landscapes and the profound nature of the more-than-human.

Craig Childs has published more than a dozen critically acclaimed books, including The Secret Knowledge of Water and his most recent, Atlas of a Lost World. He has won the Orion Book Award and has twice won the Sigurd F. Olson Nature Writing Award, the Galen Rowell Art of Adventure Award, and the Spirit of the West Award for his body of work. He is a contributing editor at Adventure Journal Quarterly and his work has appeared in the Atlantic, New York Times, and Los Angeles Times. He lives in southwest Colorado.

Claire Taylor is an artist and illustrator based in Salt Lake City, UT. Her work is inspired by the liminal space between the wild and urban, encounters with other species and experiences of the sublime. She has a master’s of science in Environmental Humanities from the University of Utah. Her website is www.clairetaylor.art. This event is presented by The King's English Bookshop and Torrey House Press. Spots in the signing line are reserved for those who buy the book from The King's English (pre-order it by visiting their website or by calling to let them know you'll be at the event).

This event is supported in part by the Utah Humanities Center for the Book; Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks; and Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and National Endowment for the Arts.



Zak Podmore Book Launch: Confluence

Bluff writer Zak Podmore presents his debut collection of nonfiction essays, Confluence: Navigating the Personal & Political on Rivers of the New West. Zak Podmore sets out to explore exploited Western rivers—and some of the most pressing environmental justice issues of our time. After losing his river-running mother to cancer, Podmore disappears into the American West’s iconic canyon country to heal. He kayaks down a rare release of water in the Colorado River Delta, investigates uranium tailings on Ute Mountain Ute lands near the San Juan River, and interrogates the treatment of asylum seekers crossing the Rio Grande. Confluence presents an up-close, personal perspective on our responsibility to rivers and to each other. Zak Podmore is an award-winning writer whose work has appeared in Outside, Sierra, High Country News, and Canoe & Kayak. He lives in Utah where he reports for The Salt Lake Tribune.

This event is presented by Friends of Cedar Mesa and Torrey House Press, and it is supported in part by Utah Humanities and Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and National Endowment for the Arts.



Zak Podmore Book Launch: Confluence

Bluff writer Zak Podmore presents his debut collection of nonfiction essays, Confluence: Navigating the Personal & Political on Rivers of the New West. Zak Podmore sets out to explore exploited Western rivers—and some of the most pressing environmental justice issues of our time. After losing his river-running mother to cancer, Podmore disappears into the American West’s iconic canyon country to heal. He kayaks down a rare release of water in the Colorado River Delta, investigates uranium tailings on Ute Mountain Ute lands near the San Juan River, and interrogates the treatment of asylum seekers crossing the Rio Grande. Confluence presents an up-close, personal perspective on our responsibility to rivers and to each other. Zak Podmore is an award-winning writer whose work has appeared in Outside, Sierra, High Country News, and Canoe & Kayak. He lives in Utah where he reports for The Salt Lake Tribune.

This event is presented by Friends of Cedar Mesa and Torrey House Press, and it is supported in part by Utah Humanities and Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and National Endowment for the Arts.



Zak Podmore Book Launch: Confluence

Bluff writer Zak Podmore presents his debut collection of nonfiction essays, Confluence: Navigating the Personal & Political on Rivers of the New West. Zak Podmore sets out to explore exploited Western rivers—and some of the most pressing environmental justice issues of our time. After losing his river-running mother to cancer, Podmore disappears into the American West’s iconic canyon country to heal. He kayaks down a rare release of water in the Colorado River Delta, investigates uranium tailings on Ute Mountain Ute lands near the San Juan River, and interrogates the treatment of asylum seekers crossing the Rio Grande. Confluence presents an up-close, personal perspective on our responsibility to rivers and to each other. Zak Podmore is an award-winning writer whose work has appeared in Outside, Sierra, High Country News, and Canoe & Kayak. He lives in Utah where he reports for The Salt Lake Tribune.

This event is presented by Friends of Cedar Mesa and Torrey House Press, and it is supported in part by Utah Humanities and Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and National Endowment for the Arts.



Author Event: Scott Graham and C. Joseph Greaves

Authors Scott Graham and C. Joseph Greaves approach conservation through the lens of expanding hearts and minds where our experience is most personal—in a book. Join us at Back of Beyond Books for an author conversation and reading of Graham's new National Park Mystery, Arches Enemy, and Greaves' new novel Church of the Graveyard Saints. In Arches Enemy, a famed sandstone arch in Utah’s Arches National Park collapses and takes a woman atop it to her death, ensnaring archaeologist Chuck Bender and his family in lethal questions of environmental monkeywrenching and political intrigue. As more deaths follow, Chuck and his wife Janelle race to uncover the killer even as they become murder targets themselves. You can never go home again. Whether as caution or lament, the adage meant nothing to Church of the Graveyard Saints protagonist Addie Decker because when she left the rural Southwest for college in Los Angeles, she vowed never to return. But when her grandmother’s death calls Addie back, she confronts a landscape both familiar and foreign as a sudden boom in gas development threatens her family’s ranching heritage—even as it promises vital prosperity to her old hometown. With her lover in tow, her high school sweetheart in waiting, and a sagebrush militia lurking in the wings, Addie must navigate a minefield of greed and obstinacy, love and violence. Scott Graham, winner of the National Outdoor Book Award, is the author of Canyon Sacrifice, Mountain Rampage, Yellowstone Standoff, and Yosemite Fall, books one through four in the National Park Mystery Series. Graham is an avid outdoorsman who lives with his wife, an emergency physician, in Durango, Colorado. C. Joseph Greaves has been a finalist for most of the major awards in crime fiction including the Shamus, Macavity, Lefty, and Audie, as well as the New Mexico-Arizona, Oklahoma, and Colorado Book Awards. He is the author of five previous novels including Hard Twisted and Tom & Lucky, a Wall Street Journal “Best Books of 2015” selection and finalist for the 2016 Harper Lee Prize. He lives in southwestern Colorado.

This event is free and open to the public and is presented by Back of Beyond Books and Torrey House Press. It is supported in part by the Ballantine Family Fund, Utah Humanities, and Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and National Endowment for the Arts.