RadioACTive 03.09.22

  • March 9, 2022
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Equality Utah's Troy Williams on the movie thriller finish of the Utah Legislature's General Session, and where we go from here to support LGBTQ+ rights. Prof. Amos Guiora with more analysis of Ukraine, including Israeli PM's Sabbath-breaking trip to Moscow. Community Co-Host Nick Burns talks about the 50th anniversary of the Columbia U anti-war riots with Jeff Schnader. The doctor-turned-author's new book, The Serpent Papers, is set against the backdrop of the sit-ins, marches and protests in which he and how his characters took part.

Tonight's show featured the following people, organizations and/or events. Check them out and get plugged into your community!

Equality Utah Executive Director Troy Williams. In the latest EU newsletter, Williams wrote: "The last few hours of the 2022 Legislative Session played out like a movie, with a third act plot twist, a shock reveal, and a last-second deus ex machina to save the day. Despite the efforts of lawmakers to ban transgender children from school sports, 23 Democrats and 19 Republicans voted NO. Right now, there are not enough lawmakers to overturn Governor Cox’s promised veto. Transgender children in Utah are still free to play if they desire."

  • March 10: QTalks Lecture Series, 7:00 p.m. at The Shop SLC, home to Equality Utah's main office. Event by Equality Utah: "The first QTalks of the year features Lisa Barlow from the Real Housewives of SLC and Owner of VIDA Tequila; Singer-songwriter Mindy Gledhill; JK! Studios Actor and Equality Utah DEI Trainer Stacey Harkey; and Producer of Strangerville Live and It Just Gets Stranger Eli McCann." Click here for tickets and details.

  • March 12: PAC Brunch 2022, 10:00 a.m. at NOIR Event Center, 602 E. 500 S. #P103, SLC. Event by Equality Utah: "Come listen to civil rights hero Shannon Minter with music from MACK! We want to see all of you there, you can get tickets at equt.org/pacbrunch2022. All money raised will go directly to supporting pro-equality candidates across the state of Utah."

Professor Amos Guiora, SJ Quinney College of Law at the UoU, with more analysis of Ukraine, including Israeli PM's Sabbath-breaking trip to Moscow last weekend.

Community Co-Host Nick Burns talked about the 50th anniversary of the Columbia U anti-war riots with Jeff Schnader. The doctor-turned-author's new book, The Serpent Papers, is set against the backdrop of the sit-ins, marches and protests in which he — and how his characters — took part. What were the Columbia University Protests of 1972 all about? Check out this timeline from the author:

  • April 12, 1972 - During a march of several hundred anti-war demonstrators to mid-Manhattan, hundreds broke through police barricades to attempt to disrupt a dinner for Vice President Agnew at the Americana Hotel. One Columbia College student was arrested for disorderly conduct while the NY Tactical Patrol Force (TPF), on horseback, swung clubs at the crowd, injuring several, in order to disperse the crowd.

  •  April 17, 1972 - Columbia University students marched down Broadway, from 116th St to 107th St, to protest renewed bombing of North Vietnam and the American invasion of Cambodia, ordered by President Nixon. Police estimated the crowd at 2,000. The students demanded a shut-down of Columbia in protest.

  •  April 18, 1972 - More than 2,000 Columbia students marched through Morningside Heights demanding that the university be shut down to protest the American military presence in Southeast Asia.

  •  April 19, 1972 - After a noon rally at the physics building (Pupin Hall), over 1,000 Columbia students again marched through Morningside Heights demanding that the university be shut down. At 3PM, University President William McGill personally presented protestors barricading Hamilton Hall with a restraining order.

  •  April 20, 1972 - More than 75 helmeted NYC police forced a group of 30 picketers to end their blockade of the 118th Street entrance to the School of International Affairs.

  •  April 22, 1972 - 50,000 demonstrators marched 30 blocks in a cold, driving rain to voice their opposition to the Vietnam War. They marched down 6th Avenue in Manhattan, filling the mid-town area, where a rally ensued with speakers including celebrities, labor leaders, and peace movement leaders. John Lennon and Yoko Ono were greeted by the crowds midway through the rally.

  •  April 24, 1972 - Lewisohn and Pupin Halls were occupied by protestors, and three students were arrested as Columbia's student strike to protest American involvement in Vietnam entered its second week.

  •  April 25, 1972 - Hundreds of NY Tactical Police surrounded hundreds of students on the Van Am Quad and stormed their demonstrations in the most violent day of Columbia University's student strike against the Vietnam War.

  •  April 26, 1972 - 100 Students seized Mathematics Hall, bringing the number of occupied campus buildings to five, ie, Pupin Physics, Lewisohn Hall, Kent Hall, Hamilton Hall, Mathematics. At 10:30PM, 200 rallied at the sundial in the center of the Columbia campus.

  • April 27, 1972 - Students in the anti-strike Majority Coalition, in support of Nixon and his "silent majority," took Mathematics Hall from anti-war protestors and briefly held Pupin Hall, which was later retaken by anti-war protestors.

  • Early May 1972 - University classes end; final exams are canceled. University President vows never to call police on campus again. 

Views, thoughts or opinions shared by guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the board, staff or members of Listeners' Community Radio of Utah, KRCL 90.9fm. Tonight's show was produced and hosted by Lara Jones and Community Co-Host Nick Burns.

 

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