RadioActive: December 6, 2017

  • December 6, 2017
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Christmas Bird Count, Jerusalem, Give Peace, Utah Mathodist, Mexican Gray Wolves

Hosted by Lara Jones and Nick Burns, tonight's show featured:

  • Great Salt Lake Audubon's 2017 Salt Lake Christmas Bird Count will be held Dec. 16. Ian Batterman explained how the citizen science project works. 
    • Want to count birds? Email him at imbatterman@gmail.com.  This event is free and is open to birders of all skill levels. If you are a beginner, you will be able to join a team that includes experienced birders. 
    • For bird identification, we recommend National Audubon's new free app "Audubon Bird Guide: North America", available at iTunes and Google Play.
  • Professor Amos Guiora, author of The Crime of Complicity, analyzed Pres. Trump’s announcement acknowledging Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and authorizing construction of a new embassy there.
  • Give the Gift of Peace, with Jenn Oxborrow of the Utah Domestic Violence Coalition
    • Through Dec. 25, Jacksons Food Stores will raise funds for the prevention, education and support for victims of domestic violence and their children, sexual assault survivors, and adolescents experiencing relationship abuse. Contributions can be made in increments of $1, $5, or $10 when making a purchase at Jacksons stores in Utah, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Arizona and Nevada. At the end of the campaign, Jacksons Chief Executive Officer, John Jackson, will match Jacksons’ Food Stores customer contributions dollar for dollar.
  • Utah Mathodist, a new podcast that looks at issues facing Utah from a mathematical perspective. Host Cody Fitzgerald talks with quantitative ecologist Dr. Peter Mahoney about cougar population modeling in the Beehive State.
  • Plus, politics trumps science, according to nearly a dozen wildlife conservation organizations in response to a "deeply flawed Mexican wolf recovery plan." RadioActive talks with Kim Crumbo, Western Conservation Director at
    Wildlands Network, and Allison Jones, Executive Director at Wild Utah Project.